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Non-GMO Products

"Not one man in a thousand has accuracy of eye and judgment sufficient to become an eminent breeder. If gifted with these qualities, and he studies his subject for years, and devotes his lifetime to it with indomitable perseverance, he will succeed and will make great improvements; if he wants any of these qualities, he will assuredly fail." - Charles Darwin By: Milo Shammas, Founder & Formulator A genetically modified organism (GMO) has had its DNA decoded and manipulated to create something different than what has developed naturally. The technique used is called genetic engineering or recombinant DNA technology. Creating…

OMRI Advanced Organic

A gold standard for organic products since 1997. OMRI serves both product manufacturers as well as the organic farming community and we are proud to develop a synergetic working relationship with CEO Peggy Miars and her talented and devoted OMRI staff. For a listing of Dr. Earth OMRI Certificates https://www.omri.org/ubersearch/results/dr%20earth  

The Advancement and Progression from ProBiotic to TruBiotic®

The capacity to blunder slightly is the real marvel of DNA. Without this special attribute, we would still be anaerobic bacteria and there would be no music. -Lewis Thomas   By: Milo Shammas, Founder & Formulator The Life Behind The Technology Soil is alive! In the beginning there was life, and life was in the soil. Understanding the life in the soil is as important for a gardener as digging in the soil. In addition to parent rocks and minerals, complex webs of microorganisms interact to perpetuate life for each other as well as plants and any subsequent consumers in…
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Organic Gardening with Peace of Mind

Not all Organics are Created Equal. From the dark ages of organic gardening and up to this very day, chicken manure has been a mainstay nutrient source for plants. A quick-acting source of nitrogen, it provides fast results but dissipates quickly – requiring frequent applications to support optimal plant growth. Valued by manufacturers of fertilizers and soils because of its low cost and easy availability, it is the main nutrient source in most organic fertilizers on the market today. Because of the prevalence of chicken manure in organic fertilizers and soils - coupled with the common perception of the very…

Dr. Earth RAW

How are raw superfoods and non-transformed ingredients superior? It is widely known that heating ingredients to high temperatures modifies their molecular composition. Moreover, vitamins, minerals, enzymes and amino acids are either destroyed or altered by cooking to stabilize them. The oils, fats, proteins, and other exotic superfoods are adultered in industrial manufacturing as they are cooked at very high temperatures. This process makes the good lipids rancid and lack the purity and strength of pure raw ingredients. Raw ingredients allow for a better assimilation in the ProBiotics digestive system. Moreover, when we look at both animal and vegetable ingredients, it…

Healthy Soil, Healthy Plants, Healthy You

Everything in every cell of your body was once a biological or elemental part of your environment, originating in the soil, air, and water. You came from the earth. Like all living things, your life is supported by the earth, and one day your physical body will return to the earth. While you are alive, the food you eat is inextricably linked to soil particles that existed millions of years ago, part of a food chain that was here before mankind even appeared on the scene. We must eat to live, but for some, eating amounts to nothing more than…

Gardening Basics #1: Know your own local environment

To succeed at gardening, you must understand your natural surroundings. Learn the usual dates of the first hard frost and the springtime thaw in your area. What you can plant and harvest depends on when your specific planting and growing season begins and ends and how long it lasts. Also, you must know where the sun rises and sets in relation to your planting beds. For example, you need to know how many hours of direct sunlight your plants can receive and where the shadows, if any, fall in the afternoon. Next, you must attune yourself to the annual and…
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Gardening Basics #2: Microclimates

Your garden is likely to have small yet important microclimates. Shadows can cause a cold pocket, and a hard surface facing the sun can reflect too much heat. These areas will not only change daily but also with the seasons. Summer might be too hot for lettuce but great for tomatoes. Anticipate these changes when you decide where to grow your garden. You may have at least four different microclimates around your home: A hot side facing south A shadowed, cool side on the north A warm western side with afternoon sun An ever-changing eastern side that may be warm…

Gardening Basics #3: Plant Zones – What To Grow Where

Your geographic climate zone will determine which plants can thrive in your garden. The USDA publishes the most commonly used hardiness zone map, which divides the continental U.S. into 11 zones derived from the average annual minimum temperatures. You can find a copy of this map online, at a local library or university, or in gardening books. Another good zone map comes from the editors of Sunset Magazine. They divided the United States and southern Canada into 45 climate zones, considering many variables such as area temperature extremes, humidity, rainfall, local topography, elevation, and even proximity to large bodies of…
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Gardening Basics #4: Sun and Shade—a defining factor

Plants that produce fruits require plenty of sun. Allow at least six hours daily for tomatoes, cucumbers, zucchini, peppers, beans, corn, eggplant, summer squash and cabbage. In general, the bigger the fruit, the more sunlight it must have. On the other hand, many vegetables and herbs do well in shaded areas, needing only about four hours of sun per day. Try carrots, beets, chard, cauliflower, chives, lettuce, chicories, radicchio, arugula, basil, mint, parsley, spinach or winter squash in these shadier areas. For leafy green vegetables, less sunlight is fine. Gardening Basics is a nine part series outlining how you can…
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Gardening Basics #5: Drainage

Sandy soils drain too quickly and clay soils too slowly. Adding organic materials helps to correct and balance both types of soil. If you have a good balance between sand, silt, clay and organic materials, you have a solid foundation for good drainage as well as moisture retention in the space between soil particles. When you improve your soil’s drainage, you reduce the level of fungal pathogens. You also improve root development and nutrient availability in a healthy aerobic environment. Do a simple test to see how your soil drains and whether you need to make changes to correct your…

Gardening Basics #6: Advantages of Growing In Raised Beds

Raised beds make it easier to plant and harvest crops and can be attractive. They also give you control over the composition of the soil. Your home’s previous owners might have contaminated the soil without you knowing it. Adding new soil to a raised bed assures you of its safety. Growing in raised beds makes projects seem more manageable, since tackling your weeding or other chores one bed at a time feels doable and satisfying. There is less back strain and better air circulation, because you don’t walk on the soil and compact it. Also, that loose, fluffy soil is…
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Gardening Basics #7: Container Gardening

Perhaps you live in an apartment, have limited space in your yard, or just don’t want to have a full-scale garden. By growing in containers, you can have an abundance of fresh vegetables and herbs just steps from the kitchen. These plants can be attractive and will enhance your patio, deck, or balcony. Nothing tastes better or is more nutritious or flavorful than fruits, vegetables, or herbs harvested minutes before eating. Paying attention to a few important rules and investing only a little time will assure you of a container garden that will be easy to set up and maintain…

Gardening Basics #8: Watering

Most plants are 90 percent water, 60 percent of which is delivered from the soil to the plant through plant root hairs. To keep your plants healthy and thriving you must have a good soil with plenty of organic matter to act like a sponge and allow the almost microscopic roots to travel through porous, well-draining soil. The best way to tell when and how much water your plant needs (whether in the ground or a container) is to feel the soil. Probe your finger about an inch or two and feel if it is dry or moist to the…

Gardening Basics #9: Making A Plan

Before a contractor can build a home, the architect must provide a plan, a blueprint that clearly shows how the house looks and functions. The same is true when creating and designing a garden of any size. You must know how to put it together. Some questions to consider are: Will you start from seeds or transplants? In-ground or raised beds? Sprinkler system or hand irrigation? Fruits, vegetables, or both? How will the elements of your garden work together? What are the sun requirements for your plants? Where will the same plant go next year? (Rotate crops each year to…

The Future Of Organic Has Arrived

The story goes like this Full of good intentions and visions of a beautiful yard and garden, we all share that same “start-of-the season” enthusiasm and conviction, just like those people who buy gym memberships in January, promising themselves they will lose weight and get in shape. In either case, success comes only to those who create a workable plan and stick to it. That can sometimes feel like the hardest thing in the world! Who wants to think about being so organized? We just want the instant gratification of transplanting a few small plants with color and some vegetables…

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Pet Safe Garden

  Animal health begins in the soil, healthy soil provides nutrients to grow healthy plants, and healthy plants are then consumed by animals. Your garden is the center of nourishment for your entire family, including your pets. When growing your fruits and vegetables keep in mind that much of the harvest should be designated for your pets. You should grow enough produce to feed both your family and your pets. Many gardeners design a garden with pet safety in mind. Your garden can have many purposes, to provide you with nutrients, and a natural environment to enjoy for both you…

Harvesting and Storing

  Most organic gardeners make excellent resolutions about producing much of the family's food. We plan extensive canning and freezing sessions to regularly use up the ever-mounting harvests that we intend to take from the garden. But the reality is that we are usually so busy with other things that the resolution falls apart. Although the arts of canning, making chutney, or even drying foods are mysteries to many of us, once mastered, they provide a surprisingly satisfying and easy way to fill a sizable pantry with the finest quality foods, for use in the winter months. Preparing food for…

Multiplying Your Plants

  Plants grown from seed, cuttings, or division are a good way of inexpensively increasing the number or plants in your garden. I have done this for years and saved a lot of money, a few tricks will help you too! Growing From Seeds This is much less expensive and can be more fun than buying cuttings or mature plants. Annuals like poppies and nasturtiums can be raised easily from seed and will often self-seed once established. Just make sure you get them from a good source. I trust my local independent nursery for guidance and directions. The simplest method…

Kids’ Secret Gardens

  To kids, young and old, a garden is a big world filled with possibilities. Even the simplest garden can be a place of mystery and excitement, but gardens can offer so much more. The best ones are filled with special places—sunny spots, trellises dripping with sweet raspberries and crisp sugary peas, pumpkin vines rampaging on fences, clumps of milky corn on the cob to be gathered and nibbled, each small kernel popping creamy sweetness, vast pools of nasturtiums with nectar to be sucked, snapdragons to be snapped, ants to watch for hours, clouds to see strange worlds in, jungles…

Teaching Kids to Garden

MY PERSONAL STORY My mother was my gardening teacher from the time I was five years old. She would build my enthusiasm before she took me out to the garden to help dig a hole or help with a little weeding. My mom knew that I was kid with a short attention span, so she would only push me as hard as she knew I would enjoy. She put me in charge—or at least, I thought I was in charge—of amending the soil. I remember she would have soil bags next to the vegetable plot every year. It was my…

Giant Pumpkins

  Giant Pumpkin Secret Growing Instructions and Tips Selecting a Planting Site Select a sunny place in your garden. Giant pumpkins thrive best in strong sunshine. The larger the area, the better (500-1000 sq. ft.), but smaller areas have been successfully planted too. An area that receives eight to twelve hours of sunlight per day is ideal. Preparing the Soil and Mound 1.) The best pumpkins come from the best-prepared soil. Dig a hole, 40''-48'' deep, 3'-5' in diameter, and mix the soil well with 6-8 bags (8-12 cubic feet) of soil amendments such as Dr. Earth® Planting Mix. More…

Growing Organic Avocados

  Avocado trees are attractive, broad-leaved evergreens. The yellow-green flesh of the fruits is rich in oil and protein. They are easy to grow outdoors in most of California, Florida, and Texas. They also make attractive houseplants but will not bear fruit indoors. Selecting Trees Avocado trees mature to a height of 15 to 45 feet and are as wide as they are high, so give them plenty of space. Mexican types have dark, rough skins and are hardy to about 22° F. Guatemalan and West Indian hybrids have smooth, green skins and are less hardy. Not all cultivars are…

Growing Organic Apricots

  Growing organic apricots can be a little bit challenging, but the sweet, aromatic fruit makes it well worth your effort. This juicy and naturally sweet fruit is one of my favorites to eat right off of the tree. Selecting Trees Doing a little research ahead of time, can help you to choose the tree best suited for your climate and will provide the best chance for success. Some apricots are self-fruiting; others need a second tree for cross-pollination. While winter-hardy, if you chose a variety that blooms too early for your climate you may lose its crop due to…

Growing Organic Apples

  Biting into a crisp apple picked fresh from your own tree is so rewarding and full of nutrition. You may never taste anything quite so delicious. Growing apples organically is easy if you follow a few basic rules. Once you have grown a successful crop, tasted the fruit of your labor, you will never want to bite into a store bought apple again. Selecting Trees Since apple trees take at least several years to bear fruit, it pays to select trees carefully before you invest time and energy in them. Consider these factors: Apple trees come in wide range…

Growing Organic Citrus

  Every home should have at least one citrus tree in the garden, where suited to the climate, to provide delicious fruits packed with vitamin C. Few things beat a freshly picked juicy tangerine just off the tree, or squeezing a little fresh lemon juice on your organic salad. Citrus trees have shiny evergreen leaves, fragrant flowers, and attractive fruits that hang for months without dropping. In northern climates, you can grow dwarf citrus trees in containers and bring them indoors during the winter. Selecting Trees There are so many types of citrus that you may have trouble deciding which…

Growing Organic Roses

  Few flowers can compete with the elegance and beauty of roses. Throughout history, and throughout the world, roses have been associated with beautifully maintained estate gardens. The good news is that you don’t have to be born rich, or own a large estate, to be able to enjoy a gorgeous rose garden. All you have to do is go to your local independent garden center to find a wide variety of roses you can plant at home and then learn the basic principles. When you grow your roses organically, they are free of pesticides, herbicides and other chemicals that…

Growing Organic Herbs

  Outside of my kitchen I have four wine barrels full of herbs. Just about every night, I harvest a variety of herbs and mix them into my salad, something I love to do. I grow mint, mustard greens, basil, thyme, rosemary, parsley, coriander, and several other types of herbs that are stunning in color and taste. Nothing dresses up a plate of food like fresh picked herbs; they add excitement to flavor and presentation. Where Do I Start? Starting with a good idea of what you like to eat will help to simplify the choices and make your job…

Planting Trees & Shrubs

Select a site with good drainage and the proper sun exposure. If water stands, or the soil is often soggy, a raised planter may be preferable. Dig a hole twice as wide as the root structure, and almost as deep as the root ball. Create a soil blend by mixing one part your soil with one part Dr. Earth® Planting Mix along with Dr. Earth® Starter Fertilizer according to product directions. Remove container and carefully score and loosen the sides and the bottom of the root ball. Plant so that the top of the root ball rests one inch above…

Repotting and Transplanting

  My many years of experience have proven that repotting plants increases health potential and overall plant growth. There is nothing complicated about moving or repotting plants unless they are enormous. A large tree, for example, will require professional help, but the principles are still the same. Potting Plants The health of a potted plant will start to deteriorate if it has out-grown its container. Roots trailing from the bottom of the pot, leaf drop, and depleted soil are signs that the plant needs repotting. One or two pot sizes larger will usually be sufficient. Don't be too eager to…

Gardening Basics

  Enriching the Soil In nature, dead or rotting vegetation, animal manure, and decaying animal remains provide adequate nutrition for the soil. As man removes the crops or gardens he grows, he must replenish the soil with organic material to maintain a healthy and productive soil. It's a simple concept. You must replace what you take out. Digging Despite the activity of earthworms, burrowing animals, and penetrating plant roots, untended soil is still relatively hard and compacted. We can improve the texture by digging, or turning over the soil, to allow oxygen and water into the soil. Seeding In nature,…

Digging the Garden

  You dig the soil for three reasons: first, to improve aeration; second, to improve structure; third, to incorporate organic matter and fertilizers that add nutrients to the soil. Gardens that have been badly neglected will need to be cleared before they can be dug. Normally, on a very overgrown plot, a trimmer will be needed to cut down the vegetation or, if you have the energy, a cultivator can be used. Compost or recycle all the perennial weeds, making sure that all weed seeds are far from the garden. Then, dig the plot. Generally, you must turn the soil…

Preparing a Seed Bed

  Seeds need plenty of air in the soil if they are to germinate successfully. Soil in which seeds are to be sown directly has to be much finer in texture than normal garden soil. All stones, bits of twigs and clods of soil should be broken down and then raked over the soil. Leave the seedbed for a month before sowing. Then rake again. Water well before and after sowing, using the shower setting on your hose. All of these steps will help to ensure a good start. Starting From Seed Start with good quality seeds you can trust.…

Planting in Containers

  Choosing a Container It is important to choose a container that is big enough to accommodate the plant's future growth. Next, check that the container has sufficient drain holes. Good drainage is very important! Transplanting Fill the container with Dr. Earth® Potting Soil until it is filled to a level that allows the base of the plant to sit one inch below the top of the container. Add Dr. Earth® Organic 2™ Starter Fertilizer according to the package directions. Holding the plant in the desired position, continue to fill in around the roots with potting soil and fertilizer mixture…

Soil Structure

  It is well worth knowing a bit about soil's actual composition. Correct analysis of the soil is one of the key elements in the success of growing certain types of plants. The kind of soil you have in your garden—along with other factors such as climate and rainfall—determine which particular plants you can grow. Since the soil is made up of mineral particles to which organic matter has been added, the nature of a particular soil depends on the nature of the underlying rock. If you live in a river valley—where particles have been ground down to form silt…

Natural Lawn Care

  The way to a lush green lawn begins with an understanding of how lawns grow and a respect for the needs of the grass plants. Misunderstanding and mistakes abound, especially in the areas of mowing, watering, and fertilizing. Let’s take a look at these aspects of lawn care. Mowing How high or low you set the mower blade is based on the needs of the grass plants at the time, and that can change with the seasons. But one of the biggest mistakes people make is setting the blades too low. Their theory is that by cutting the grass…

Home Grown Tomatoes

  I have never tasted an organically grown tomato that was not delicious. In fact, every home grown organic tomato I have ever tasted has been more delicious than any tomato I have ever bought at the supermarket. Tomatoes are fun and easy to grow once you know the basic growing requirements: sun, water, trellising, good soil, and feeding. Sun Most tomatoes require full sunlight for maximum growth and fruit size, although there are varieties that can tolerate less sunlight than others and still remain very productive. Check with your local nursery professional for those varieties if sunlight is limited…

Compost Tea

Soil Drench Apply tea directly to the soil. Note: Expect to see solid material at the bottom of the bucket. Do not throw this solid material away. Spread these solids as nutrient-rich mulch around any plant in the garden. That's it! Tea is fun in the sun! Sit back and watch your plants grow. PROBIOTIC™ Dr. Earth Organic Fertilizer Tea For a rich tea made from Dr. Earth's® Organic Fertilizer, mix 2 pounds, or 5 cups of fertilizer for every 5 gallons of water. Let the mixture set for 24 hours. Strain well and mulch all the solids around the…

Container Vegetables

  Container Vegetable Gardens A 4 foot by 8 foot balcony is all you need to grow enough organic vegetables to satisfy your hungry appetite. When space is limited in your garden, or if you live in an apartment or just do not want to invest time in a full-scale vegetable garden, you can still enjoy homegrown vegetables within reach of your kitchen. Growing organic vegetables in containers is rewarding and easy. Just pay close attention to a few important rules and you can invest minimal amounts of time to harvest an abundance of organic vegetables. The tips in this…

Clean Water, Clean Lakes

  The Connection Between Fertilizer and Water Quality Water quality starts at home Clean water in our lakes, reservoirs and streams starts at home with basic practices you can incorporate into your lawn and garden care program. There is a pipeline from your garden to a body of water. Regardless of where you live, you are a part of a watershed —a region where water flows across or under on its way to a lake, river, stream or ocean. Year-round lawn and garden care practices impact water quality even if you don't live near a body of water. The problem:…

Planting with Nature

  If your soil presents specific problems with its structure—for example, being very wet or very dry—rather than expend great quantities of energy trying to bring it closer to the norm, you can always copy nature, and grow those plants that will thrive naturally in such conditions. For instance, if you have an area of land in your garden that has poor drainage, often caused by heavy clay soil, you have the ideal conditions in which to create a bog garden. The virtues of a bog garden are that the plants that thrive there are usually large and lush with…

Diversity is Key to Abundance

  In the natural world, diversity is the perfect model for sustainable ecosystems. Diversity is a major factor in preventing pest and disease build-up because of the way in which organisms interact. When any one species becomes dominant in an area, its predators will move in to take advantage of the bounty. Eventually, they will reduce the numbers of the dominant species, restoring the balance of Nature. In the past, farmers relied on natural methods of farming because chemicals were not available to them. Now, it is possible to grow crops as monocultures, because the use of pesticides has given…

The Organic Revolution

There are proven methods that farmers can use worldwide to sustain profits, address hunger and malnutrition, and renew ecological health. To feed the world in the most effective manner, a vast movement of scientists, development experts, farming associations and environmentalists is calling for a new emphasis on sustainable agriculture. This is an extreme opposite from current practices. ''The Green Movement” New research shows that the latest ecological approaches to organic agriculture offer affordable, readily usable ways to increase yields and access to nutritional foods in Third World countries. The organic method, applied to agriculture, can feed the world and may…

The Organic Method

  There is nothing mysterious or magical about organic gardening. It is simply a way of working with nature rather than against it. The objective is to recycle organic matter back into the soil, to maintain soil structure and fertility, and to encourage natural methods of pest and disease control, rather than relying on chemicals. It is, in fact, a lot less mysterious than the methods employed by the chemical grower. Organic gardening is much more than just growing plants without chemical fertilizers and artificial sprays. It is a lifestyle. It recognizes that that the complex workings of nature have…

The Living Soil

  Some 450 million years ago, plants first spread out over the land. As slow colonization progressed, an interaction began between the underlying rock and the remains of plants. Soil, in all its various forms, was gradually being produced and eventually became the land form upon which all life on Earth ultimately depends. The ability of animals to move allows them freedom to choose favorable habitats, even under changing conditions. A plant, on the other hand, is usually in one place for life, its root system hidden, and its destiny dependent on the soil for anchorage, nutrients and moisture. Plants…

Homegrown Medicine

By Milo Lou Shammas, Founder and Formulator The healing power of herbs Mankind’s history of using herbal medicines far predates modern medical doctors. For thousands of years, the use of herbs for healing was common practice. Asians were the best documenters of herbal medicine. Throughout history, populations from the Near East (Lebanese and Phoenicians) to the Far East (Chinese) have used herbs for healing and health maintenance. The experiences of billions of people across the Earth, over centuries, provide better proof of the efficacy of herbs than clinical studies involving a few thousands ever could. Even today, herbal healing is…

Farm to Fork

  ''The nutrition that your fruits and vegetables provide you is only as good as the nutrition you provide your soil.'' I said this publically on July 17, 1992, at a community garden in Los Angeles. This statement is more important today than it was then, and it will be even more important in another 20 years. You are what you eat Our politicians and leaders of the agribusiness and food industries assure us that the American food supply is the highest quality and the most nutritious in the world, that we Americans enjoy the greatest food choices, and that…

Botany 101

  Over the years, I have had the pleasure of introducing countless numbers of people to plant science. My desire to relate the wonders of plant biology, and its relationship to our daily lives, inspired me to write this article. The science of botany is divided into various disciplines, each having its specialties. Among them, cytology (Greek: kytos, meaning “container”) is the detailed study of cells. Study of the form and structure of plants is the work of morphologists (Greek: morphe, meaning “form”). Most gardeners are more familiar with morphology than with cytology. Basic understanding of how plants function makes…

Parsnips

Health PowerBenefits are similar to potatoes. The main difference: parsnips have more fiber and folate but less vitamin C per weight. (Still a great source, with half the RDA of C in one parsnip.) With more dietary fiber, parsnips better support digestion. They help everything flow smoothly, get rid of excess cholesterol and regulate blood sugar. Folate is known to lower homocysteine in the blood, preventing plaque buildup that harms blood vessel structure. Pregnant women need folate to promote healthy fetal nerve development. Also a good source of vitamin K, which helps develop a dense bone matrix. Parsnips have some…
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